Kali Linux Certification Details

Kali Linux is an open-source Debian-based distribution designed for digital forensics, penetration testing and security auditing. It was developed by Mati Aharoni and Devon Kearns of Offensive Security through the rewriting of BackTrack.

Kali Linux has more than 600 pre-installed penetration-testing programs, making it one of the best tools an ethical hacker can use. The distribution is available in 32-bit and 64-bit editions with a default GNOME desktop environment or Xfce in some Community Editions (CE).

Is Kali Linux Certification Free?


Yes, Kali Linux Certification is free. There are no upfront costs or charges to take the exam. Anyone around the world can become a Kali Linux Certified Professional (KLCP) without any cost incurred.

Is Kali Linux Used Professionally?


One of the most common questions we get asked is “Can I use Kali for professional purposes?” The answer is an absolute yes! In fact, many large organizations have teams of security professionals who utilize our open source tools on a daily basis during their engagements.

Large companies such as Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter, Amazon, etc., all have employees who use and love our toolsets. We also see smaller boutique companies emerge all the time, making great use of our tools during their customer’s professional engagements.

Can I Learn Kali Linux as a Beginner?


Yes, you can learn Kali Linux as a beginner. There are many online resources and tutorials available that can help you get started with learning the basics of Kali Linux. In addition, there are several books available on Amazon that can help guide you through your journey of becoming a pentester/ethical hacker.

What Is KLCP Certification?


KLCP (Kali Linux Certified Professional) is Offensive Security’s certification for penetration testers who have demonstrated their skills in carrying out professional-level penetration testing engagements.

The KLCP was created to recognize the skills and knowledge needed to be proficient in conducting professional security assessments utilizing the OS toolsets.

The certification comprises an exam that must be taken within 6 months from when you start the coursework and successfully complete exercises.

How Long Does It Take to Learn Kali Linux?


This largely depends on your prior experience and knowledge. However, we would estimate that it would take anywhere between 2-4 weeks for somebody with little to no experience in pen-testing or ethical hacking, to be able to understand and utilize the majority of tools that Kali has to offer.

How Much Does KCLP Cost?


The Kali Linux Certified Professional (KLCP) certification is a completely free, online certification that can be obtained by anyone, from anywhere in the world.

Kali Linux Certified Professional Salary


The average salary for a “Kali Linux Certified Professional” ranges from approximately $70,287 per year for a Lead Consultant to $122,720 per year for Penetration Tester.

5 Best Kali Linux Certification Course Online


These are some of the most popular Kali Linux/Penetration Testing Certification courses online/offline-

1. Kali Linux Revealed: Master the Penetration Testing Distribution [udemy.com]

This course is designed for absolute beginners and will teach you the basics of Kali Linux, penetration testing and information security. You will learn how to install Kali Linux, configure it for your needs, and use its various toolsets for conducting ethical hacking and penetration testing tasks.

2. Mastering Advanced Web Penetration Testing in Kali Linux [udemy.com]

This course takes a hands-on approach to teach web penetration testing by providing instructions on how to carry out each stage of an attack using freely available tools such as Burp Suite Professional, SQLMAP and Metasploit Framework.

3. Kali Linux Wireless Penetration Testing Beginner’s Guide – Third Edition [amazon.com]

Kali Linux Wireless Penetration Testing Beginner’s Guide, 3rd Edition teaches readers how to understand penetrative testing methodologies as well as attack wireless networks by using their own wireless cards and equipment rather than the expensive test gear found with many commercial products today.

4. [Udacity] Intro to Information Security with Kali Linux [udacity.com]

In this course, you’ll be introduced to the exciting world of Information Security. You’ll get a chance to explore the latest ethical hacking tools and techniques using Kali Linux.

You’ll learn how to assess an organization’s security posture, identify and exploit vulnerabilities, and prepare for certification exams such as CompTIA’s PenTest+.

5. [Virtual Classroom Training] Certified Ethical Hacker v9 (CEHv9) [ec-council.org]

This training course will immerse you into the Hacker Mindset so that you will be able to think like a hacker and better protect against future attacks. This course’s purpose is to teach you how to employ an ethical hacking approach in a penetration testing or ethical hacking setting.

You’ll leave with highly sought-after ethical hacking abilities and the internationally renowned Certified Ethical Hacker certification.

Conclusion


In conclusion, Kali Linux is a great tool for ethical hacking and penetration testing. It is used by many large organizations and has many resources available to help beginners get started. The Kali Linux Certified Professional (KLCP) certification is a free, online certification that can be obtained by anyone from anywhere in the world.

Best Linux File Managers

You may, however, install a variety of file managers with a variety of functions to match your needs. So, if you’re a Linux user who wants to experiment with alternative file managers, don’t worry; there are plenty of options available online.

In this article, we’ll go through the best Linux file managers you can use right now to handle your duties.

We’ll talk about the 11 best file managers for Linux in this article. The popularity, functionality, and most recent update of these file managers are used to compile the following list. Every file manager will have its own set of features, advantages and disadvantages, and installation procedure.

11 Best File Managers For Linux


The 11 best file managers for Linux, based on our findings in 2022 are:

1. Dolphin

Dolphin is a free KDE file manager that you may install. It has a simple user interface that lets you examine the contents of your flash storage devices and hard discs. You have a lot of options when it comes to creating, copying, moving, renaming, and deleting files.

Dolphin is a useful file management program that makes file administration much easier. You may download numerous plugins from its official website if you wish to expand its capabilities. Dolphin has three view modes: the tree view, grid view, and detail view. Dolphin may be used as a single file manager for both network and local files on your Linux computer.

Key Characteristics:

  • Dolphin’s functionality may be enhanced using a variety of plugins.
  • A built-in terminal lets you run any command from a specific folder.
  • It has a URL navigation bar that allows users to browse local directories.
  • For accessing numerous folders at once, there is a split view and a multiple tab capability.
  • It has a dockable panel that may be used to display additional information.
  • The Dolphin file manager’s right-click menu offers a variety of rapid choices for sharing, duplicating, and compressing files.

2. Thunar

Thunar is an excellent file manager that is meant to be more responsive and quicker than other file managers. It’s designed for the Desktop Environment and comes pre-installed with the GNOME accessibility toolkit.

By design, it’s a simple and less resourceful tool, but you may expand its capabilities with other plugins. It complies with all industry requirements and is compatible with assistive technology. It has a simple UI with no confusing or needless features, making it simple to work with.

Key Characteristics:

  • Thunar has a terminal emulator.
  • Users can try renaming numerous files at the same time.
  • Multiple files can be renamed at a time.
  • Emblems can be used to identify folders for quick and easy referencing.
  • Thunar’s functionality may be enhanced by using a variety of plugins.
  • It has a volume manager that dynamically organizes removable media devices.
  • It contains a “Transmit To” feature that allows you to send files with only one click.

3. Konqueror

Konqueror is a free and open-source file manager that also includes a web browser. As a result, you may access both network and local files from the same manager. The term “Konqueror” points to a conqueror that can meet the needs of web browsers as well as file managers.

Konqueror grew up in the KDE environment, but in KDE 4, Dolphin took over as the default file manager.

Konqueror has a straightforward user interface that lets you quickly move, copy, search, and delete files. It also includes sophisticated features like FTP and SFTP access, SMB shares, archive access, and more.

Key Characteristics:

  • Konqueror may be customised to meet the needs of the user.
  • It comes with a fully loaded FTP client, which allows the user to divide the observable interface and examine both distant and local files in a singular window.
  • KParts, Service-menus, KIO, and many other plugins are supported.
  • Users can use KHTML or KDEWebKit as a rendering engine to surf the web.
  • It also allows HTTPS, BitTorrent, FTP and HTTP downloads from many domains.

4. Nemo

Nemo is a free, open-source, adeptly-featured file manager with a clean, quick, and easy graphical user interface. Linux Mint created it, and it was originally launched in 2012. Nemo is the default file manager for the Cinnamon desktop environment.

For optimum performance, Nemo employs both GNOME Virtual File System (GVf) and Gnome Input/Output (GIO) It offers a double-pane mode that makes moving, copying, and pasting files and folders a breeze. You may access both local and network files from the same exact window using this file manager. It comes with a number of bookmark management features as well as a number of navigation choices.

Key Characteristics:

  • Nemo features a built-in terminal that allows you to run commands right from a file manager.
  • It comes with a GTK bookmarks management feature.
  • There are several navigation choices available, including back, refresh, up, and forward.
  • Media Transfer Protocol (MTP) and File Transfer Protocol (FTP) are supported by Nemo (FTP).
  • It has a number of extensions that may be used to expand its capabilities.
  • To rename numerous folders at once, Nemo includes a bulk renaming option.

5. PCManFM

Thunar, Konqueror, and Nautilus were all replaced by PCManFM or PCMan File Manager. It is a file manager, yet it has many of the same functions as other Linux file managers.

Nemo was revamped in 2010 by redesigning it from the ground up and setting it differently. As a result, the most recent version of PCManFM differs significantly from previous versions. It’s a GNU-General Public licensed utility that’s available for free. The most recent version of PCManFM-Qt is a major component of LXQt, however, in 2020, the ArchLinux group switched PCManFM to gtk 3.

Key Characteristics:

  • PCManFM provides a variety of features, including a twin-panel interface, bookmarking, photo thumbnails, and multilingual support.
  • There are several view options available, including a detailed view, icon view, compact view, and thumbnail view.
  • Users may simply mount, eject, unmount and manage storage devices with volume management.
  • It can handle SFTP, WebDav, and SMB and supports gvf with full access to remote files.
  • It supports drag and Drops capabilities, which makes it more accessible.
  • PCManFM also comes with a number of plugins that allow users to tailor it to their own requirements.

6. Double Commander

Double Commander is a free file manager that works on both Linux and Windows systems. It’s based on the Windows-only Total Commander file manager. Double Commander is a built-in text editor with syntax highlighting capabilities.

Because of its easy interface, you can simply build, modify, and display file components. It can queue activities in the backdrop so that the user can operate without being interrupted by pop-ups. Despite the fact that it was published in 2007, updates are performed on a regular basis to ensure that there are no problems or errors.

Key Characteristics:

  • Users may view several files at the same time with Double Commander’s dual-pane UI.
  • It comes with a built-in file viewer that allows you to view files in, binary, text or hex format.
  • The multi-rename capability allows users to rename numerous files at once.
  • CPIO, GZ, ZIP, ZIPX, DEB, RPM, 7Z, and more archive formats are supported.
  • It works with a variety of plugins, including Total Commander WCX, WDX, and WFX.

7. GNOME Files (Nautilus)

GNOME Files, formerly known as “Nautilus,” is the official file manager for the GNOME desktop. It has a basic user interface yet is jam-packed with functions. This single file manager allows you to access both network and local files.

You may quickly recover deleted files in GNOME Files. It’s also quite simple to use the search features to find files. Aside from that, you may install other plugins to improve its powers and features. To access local and distant file systems, GNOME Files use an abstraction layer.

Key Characteristics:

  • GNOME Files features an embedded tracker that rapidly returns search results.
  • Batch renaming allows users to rename numerous files at once.
  • It offers a straightforward user interface and straightforward choices.
  • For archive files, it has compress and de-compress options.
  • Users can customize the design of the site by adding different typefaces.

8. Nnn

Nnn, often known as n3, is a free and open-source CLI file manager for Linux operating system. It comes with a slew of features that make file administration a breeze for the end-user.

Nnn’s main purpose is to provide a file management platform that consumes the least amount of space and memory possible. Another advantage of Nnn is that it uses very few resources. You may also use plugins to provide other functions like mounting drives, reading files, and so on. Nnn also includes a number of extra tools to help you manage your files efficiently while conserving resources.

Key Characteristics:

  • For appropriate file management, Nnn requires fewer resources and memory.
  • Users can install multiple plugins to customize their features to meet their own requirements.
  • Its text-primary user interface makes file management activities more manageable.
  • It has a variety of settings so that the user may tailor it to his or her needs.
  • It contains mime information as well as extensive file statistics.

9. Krusader

Krusader is a fully-featured dual-pane file manager with a straightforward user interface. It’s a basic file manager that’s very configurable, quick, and user-friendly. It is still a popular Linux file manager, despite the fact that it was previously updated in 2019.

Multiple archive formats are supported, including ARJ, bzip2, ZIP, GZIP, TAR, LHA ACE, and others. Krusader is also capable of handling KIO slaves such as SMB. Mounted file system support, enhanced view/edit/search, directory sync, batch left, and file-content comparison features are all available in Krusader. Krusader may also be enhanced with a variety of plugins available from the KDE Store.

Key Characteristics:

  • SFTP and FTP are both supported by Krusader for file transmission.
  • It allows you to compare the contents of files and synchronize directories.
  • It comes with a pre-loaded terminal that allows the user to run commands from any directory.
  • The file authority/permissions may be simply seen and edited by users.
  • For greater accessibility, it offers a sophisticated search module.

10. Midnight Commander

Midnight Commander is a command-line file manager with cross and multi-platform compatibility. Because it is released under the GNU General Public License, it is also known as GNU Midnight Commander.

Midnight Commander is a powerful file manager that lets you move, paste, copy, remove, and rename files and folders with ease. You may also use the subshell to perform commands, which contain file reader and editing options. It features two text-mode windows, each of which unveils the contents of the directories selected.

Key Characteristics:

  • It has a subshell that allows users to perform various commands.
  • RPM Packages’ files and metadata can be seen by users.
  • This Linux file manager’s search function allows users to quickly find any file.
  • It also has a syntax highlighting feature.
  • The bulk rename feature allows users to rename numerous files at a time.

11. Ranger

Ranger is a Linux command-line file manager with VI key bindings. It integrates practically all of the GUI file manager’s functionality into the terminal. It has a simple and attractive curse interface with a directory hierarchy view. Ranger’s file launcher is excellent at automatically determining the software to use for which file type.

Key Characteristics:

  • Support for UTF-8 (if your Python copy supports it)
  • Display with many columns
  • The selected file/directory is shown in a preview.
  • Typical file operations (create, chmod, copy, delete, etc.)
  • VIM-like terminal with hotkeys for renaming many files at once
  • Determine file kinds automatically and launch them with the appropriate applications.
  • After closing Ranger, change the directory of your shell.
  • Tabs, bookmarks, and mouse support are all available.

Conclusion


There you have 11 of the best Linux file managers. We hope you find this list useful, and that you’re able to find the perfect file manager for your needs.

Best Linux Books (2022 UPDATE)

So, you’re interested in learning about Linux? There are many great books available to help you learn Linux. Whether you are an advanced user looking to learn more, a beginner just starting out, or a DevOps professional, there is a book for you.

In this blog post, we will explore some of the best Linux books for all types of users. We will also discuss what each book covers and how it can benefit you in your journey to mastering Linux.

So, if you are ready to learn more about this popular open-source operating system, keep reading!

15 Best Linux Books


In this article, we’ll recommend 15 of the best books about Linux for beginners and experienced users alike.

1) Linux Pocket Guide: Essential Commands

Author name: Elijah Georgievski

This little book is packed with useful information on the most essential commands for working with Linux. It’s perfect for beginners who want a quick reference guide to the most common commands, and it’s also handy for more experienced users who need a reminder of how to do things.

The book is organized into sections by topic, such as “Navigating the Filesystem” and “Working with Text Files”. Each section contains a brief description of the topic, followed by a list of relevant commands.

This book is also available in other languages, including French, German, Spanish, and Portuguese.

2) The Linux Command Line

Author Name: William E. Shotts Jr.

The Linux Command Line is a comprehensive introduction to the command line interface of Linux. It covers all the essential commands for working with files, directories, software packages, network configuration, and much more.

This book is aimed at beginner and intermediate users who want to learn how to use the command line effectively. However, even experienced users will find something new in this book since it covers some lesser-known commands and features that are often overlooked.

3) Linux For Beginners: An Introduction to The Linux Operating System And Command Line

Author Name: Jason Cannon

This book is perfect for absolute beginners who know nothing about Linux but want to learn. It starts with the very basics, such as what Linux is and why you might want to use it.

It then goes on to cover the most essential commands for working with files, directories, and software packages. By the end of this book, you will have a good understanding of how Linux works and be able to do most things that you need to do on a daily basis.

4) Linux Command Line and Shell Scripting Bible

Author Name: Richard Blum

This comprehensive book covers everything you need to know about working with the command line and shell scripting in Linux. It covers all the common commands, as well as some more advanced ones that are often used by system administrators and power users.

This book also includes a section on shell scripting, which can be used to automate repetitive tasks or create simple programs. If you’re new to shell scripting, this book will teach you everything you need to know; if you’re already familiar with it, this book will show you how to put it to good use on your Linux system.

5) Command Line Kung Fu

Author name: Eliot Lee HNowitzke Jr

This short book is packed with useful tips and tricks for using the command line interface of Linux. It covers a wide range of topics, such as how to work with files, directories, software packages, and network configuration.

This book is aimed at intermediate and advanced users who want to learn how to use the command line more effectively. However, even beginner users will find something new in this book since it covers some lesser-known commands and features that are often overlooked.

6) Linux Administration

Author Name: Michael Still

This book is perfect for system administrators who need to manage Linux servers. It covers all the essential commands for working with files, directories, software packages, network configuration, security settings, and much more.

7) Linux: The Complete Reference

Author Name: Richard Petersen

This comprehensive guide covers everything you need to know about working with Linux. It includes information on all the common commands, as well as some more advanced ones that are often used by power users and system administrators.

This book also includes a section on shell scripting, which can be used to automate repetitive tasks or create simple programs. If you’re new to shell scripting, this book will teach you everything you need to know; if you’re already familiar with it, this book will show you how to put it to good use on your Linux system.

8) How Linux Works

Author Name: Brian Ward

This book is perfect for absolute beginners who want to learn how Linux works under the hood. It starts with a brief history of Linux and then goes on to cover the most essential components of the operating system, such as the kernel, shells, and command-line tools.

By the end of this book, you will have a good understanding of how Linux works and be able to troubleshoot common problems. You will also be familiar with some of the advanced features that power users and system administrators often use.

9) Introduction To Linux: A Hands on Guide

Author name: Machtelt Garrels

This comprehensive guide covers everything you need to know about working with Linux. It starts with the basics, such as what Linux is and why you might want to use it, and then goes on to cover more advanced topics such as the command-line interface, software packages, and network configuration.

This book aims at beginner and intermediate users who want to learn more about how Linux works. However, even experienced users will find something new in this book since it covers some lesser-known commands and features that are often overlooked.

10) Linux For Developers

Author Name: Johnathon Cooper

This book is perfect for developers who need to work with Linux systems. It covers all the essential commands for working with files, directories, software packages, network configuration, and much more.

It also includes a section on shell scripting, which can be used to automate repetitive tasks or create simple programs. If you’re new to shell scripting, this book will teach you everything you need to know; if you’re already familiar with it, this book will show you how to put it to good use on your Linux system.

11) Learn Linux Quickly

Author name: Peter Membrey

This short book is packed with useful information on the most essential commands for working with Linux. It’s perfect for beginners who want a quick reference guide to the most common commands, and it’s also handy for more experienced users who need a reminder of how to do things.

The book is organized into sections by topic, such as “Navigating the Filesystem” and “Working With Text Files”. Each section contains a brief description of the topic, followed by a list of relevant commands.

12) Linux In a Nutshell: A Desktop Quick Reference

Author Name: Ellen Siever

This book is a comprehensive reference guide to the most common commands for working with Linux. It covers all the essential commands for working with files, directories, software packages, and network configuration.

This book is perfect for both beginners and experienced users who need a quick reference guide to the most common commands. It’s also handy for more experienced users who want to learn about some of the lesser-known features and options that are available.

13) The Linux Programming Interface

Author Name: Michael Kerrisk

This book is a comprehensive guide to programming in Linux. It covers all the essentials, such as system calls, library functions, and dealing with threads.

It also includes a section on shell scripting, which can be used to automate repetitive tasks or create simple programs. If you’re new to shell scripting, this book will teach you everything you need to know; if you’re already familiar with it, this book will show you how to put it to good use on your Linux system.

14) Linux System Programming: Talking Directly to The Kernel And C Library

Author Name: Christian Brauner

This book is perfect for programmers who want to learn how to write code that interfaces directly with the Linux kernel and C library. It covers all the essential concepts, such as system calls, file I/O, memory management, and process control.

15) Linux For Beginners: An Introduction to The Linux Operating System And Command Line

Author Name: Jason Cannon

This book is perfect for absolute beginners who know nothing about Linux but want to learn. It starts with the very basics, such as what Linux is and why you might want to use it.

It then goes on to cover the most essential commands for working with files, directories, and software packages. By the end of this book, you will have a good understanding of how Linux works and be able to do most things that you need to do on a daily basis.

Conclusion


So, there you have it! 15 of the best Linux books for beginners and experienced users alike. No matter what your level of expertise is, you’re sure to find something on this list that will help you take your Linux skills to the next level.

And answering the question, “What is the best book about Linux?”, well, it depends on what your requirements are. If you’re a beginner then we recommend “Linux for Beginners: An Introduction to The Linux Operating System And Command Line”.

If you’re an experienced user then we recommend “The Linux Programming Interface”, which is a comprehensive guide to programming in Linux.

Happy Learning!

25 Free E-Books To Learn Linux [PDF Download]

Linux is often used as a server operating system, so learning Linux can be beneficial for system administrators and network engineers. No matter what your reasons for wanting to learn Linux are, there are plenty of resources available to help you get started.

In this article, we will share with you 25 free resources that you can use to learn Linux. These resources include books, websites, online courses, and more.

Here are 25 free books to help you learn Linux for free:

1. Free materials to learn Linux for absolute beginners


Whether you’re just getting started with Linux or looking to brush up on your skills, these free resources will set you on the right path.

Introduction to Linux by Linux Foundation [Video Course]

The Linux Foundation offers a free, self-paced video course that covers the basics of working with the Linux operating system. Throughout the course, you’ll get practical experience with common tasks like navigating the file system, installing software, Linux commands and managing user permissions.

Link: introduction-to-linux

Linux Journey [Online Portal]

Linux Journey is an excellent online resource for beginner Linux users. The site offers a wealth of articles, tutorials, and tips to help you get started with learning about and using Linux. You can also find helpful guides on topics like Bash scripting, Linux commands and security.

Link: linuxjourney.com

Learn Linux in 5 Days [eBook]

This free eBook offers a concise yet thorough introduction to working with Linux. The book is divided into five sections, each covering a different aspect of using the operating system: getting Started, knowing your way around the interface, administering your system, and customizing and extending functionality, and even managing your own Linux distribution.

Link: www.linuxtrainingacademy.com/itsfoss-ll5d

The Ultimate Linux Newbie Guide [eBook]

As its name suggests, this guide is aimed at absolute beginners who know next to nothing about using or working with Linux, Linux Systems, and Linux distributions. That said, even if you’re not starting from scratch, the guide does provide a helpful overview of many common tasks and concepts. 

Link: linuxnewbieguide.org/ulngebook2017

2. Free Linux eBooks for Beginners to Advanced


For those who prefer to learn from a book, there are plenty of excellent Linux books available online. These free Linux eBooks cover everything from the basics of working with Linux to more advanced topics like programming and shell scripting and sometimes even another open-source operating system.

Introduction to Linux [eBook]

This free eBook from the Linux Documentation Project is a great starting point for learning about what Linux is and how it works. The book covers everything from installation to using the Bash shell and common command-line tools.

Link: tldp.org/LDP/intro-linux/intro-linux.pdf

Linux Fundamentals [eBook]

This free Linux eBook from TheGeek Stuff covers the basics of working with the Linux operating system. You’ll learn about things like the directory structure, file permissions, environment variables, and text editors, and even manage your own custom Linux system. 

Link: tldp.org/LDP/intro-linux/intro-linux.pdf

Advanced Linux Programming [eBook]

As the title suggests, this free Linux book is aimed at those who want to take their Linux skills to a higher level. Topics covered include process management, interprocess communication, signals and interrupts, and threading.

Link: advanced-linux-programming.pdf

Linux From Scratch [eBook]

Not for the faint of heart, this 700+ page eBook walks you through building your own customized version of the Linux operating system from scratch for soon-to-be Linux users. 

Link: www.linuxfromscratch.org

3. Free eBooks to learn Linux command line and Shell scripting


The free linux ebooks cover a wide range of topics, from the basics of the command line and shell scripts to more advanced topics like creating custom scripts. Whether you’re one of the beginners or the advanced users, these books will help you become more proficient at using these powerful tools.

The Linux Command Line [eBook]

This eBook is perfect for beginners who want to learn about the basics of the command line. It covers topics such as navigation, working with files and directories, managing software, and much more.

Link: linuxcommand.org/tlcl

GNU/Linux Command−Line Tools Summary [eBook]

This book provides a quick reference guide for common commands that are used on the Linux command line. It’s great for experienced users who want to brush up on their skills or newcomers who want a handy reference guide. Can be downloaded in a pdf format.

Link: GNU-Linux-Tools-Summary.pdf

Bash Reference Manual from GNU [eBook]

This manual describes Bash features that are available to all users of the shell. It includes a detailed description of the syntax and semantics of all major features, along with numerous examples.

Link: www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bash.pdf

Bash Guide for Beginners [eBook]

This guide is intended for people who have never used the Bash shell before, as well as for experienced users who want to learn about the new features in Bash 4.0. It covers topics such as installation, configuration, Shell scripting, and much more.

Link: bash.pdf

Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide [eBook]

This guide is aimed at programmers who are already familiar with Bourne shell programming and are ready to learn bash programming. It covers topics such as Shell built-in commands, Looping constructs, Arrays, Regular expressions, and more. Can also be downloaded in a pdf format.

Link: abs-guide.pdf

Linux 101 Hacks [eBook]

This eBook contains 101 practical tips and tricks for the Linux command line. It covers a wide range of topics such as file management, networking, device drivers, software installation, and much more.

Link: www.thegeekstuff.com/linux-101-hacks-ebook

4. Free eBooks for SysAdmins


If you’re looking for some helpful sysadmin resources, check out this great list of free Linux eBooks. Topics covered include system administration, networking, security, device drivers, and more. Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned pro, there’s sure to be something here for you.

The Debian Administration’s Handbook [eBook]

This book covers everything from installation to advanced topics such as network configuration, securing your system, and performance tuning. If you want to learn how to administer a Debian-based system, this is the book for you.

Link: debian-handbook.info/about-the-book

Advanced Linux System Administration [eBook]

This book covers advanced topics such as managing software packages, configuring Apache and Nginx web servers, setting up networking services and custom Linux system,s and more. If you’re already familiar with the basics of Linux administration, this book will take your skills to the next level. 

Link: www.nongnu.org

Linux System Administration [eBook]

This book covers all aspects of Linux system administration, including user management, file permissions, installing software, and troubleshooting common problems. It’s perfect for anyone who wants to learn more about administering a Linux system.

Link: linux-training.be/linuxsys.pdf

Linux Servers [eBook]

This book provides an overview of the most popular server software applications used on Linux systems today. It covers topics such as email servers, web servers, database servers, and more. If you want to learn about setting up and maintaining a Linux server, this is the book for you.

Link: linuxsrv.pdf

Linux Networking [eBook]

This book covers the basics of networking on a Linux system. It covers topics such as IP addresses, routing, firewalls, and more. If you want to learn about networking on a Linux system, this is the book for you.

Link: linuxnet.pdf

Linux Storage [eBook]

This book covers everything you need to know about storage on a Linux system. It covers topics such as partitions, RAID, LVM, and more. If you want to learn about storing data on a Linux system, this is the book for you.

Link: linuxsto.pdf

Linux Security [eBook]

This book covers security best practices for a Linux system. It covers topics such as user permissions, firewalls, encryption, and more. If you want to learn about securing a Linux system, this is the book for you.

Link: linuxsec.pdf

Also Read: Free Linux Training Courses to Learn Online

Your favorite Linux learning material?


Linux Books tend to be very comprehensive and always up-to-date with the latest information. Plus, they usually come with lots of great examples that you can follow along with.

Do you have any favourite Linux learning materials? Let us know in the comments below!

Free Training Courses to Learn Linux Online

Linux is a powerful open-source operating system that is popular with developers and system administrators. While it can be challenging to learn, there are a number of free courses and resources available online to help you get started.

In this article, we will share some of the best free courses to learn Linux online. Whether you’re a beginner or an experienced Linux user, these free Linux courses will help you take your skills to the next level.

Free Linux Training Courses


Whether you are new to Linux or looking to improve your existing skills, these websites offer a variety of free online courses that can help you reach your goals:

1. Introduction to Linux

The Linux Foundation’s “Introduction to Linux” course is a free, self-paced online course that covers all of the fundamentals of working with the Linux operating system and Linux basics.

Topics include an overview of the history and development of Linux, working with the command line, managing files and directories, using text editors, and more. Upon completion of the course, you will have a good understanding of how to work with Linux on a daily basis.

2. Fundamentals of Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Red Hat’s “Fundamentals of Red Hat Enterprise Linux” course is designed for individuals who are new to working with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

The course begins with an overview of RHEL and then covers topics such as installation and configuration, working with the command line, administering users and groups, managing software packages, and more.

By the end of this course, you will be able to confidently use RHEL in your work environment.

3. C Programming: Using Linux Tools and Libraries

Carnegie Mellon University’s “C Programming: Using Linux Tools and Libraries” course is designed for students who have some experience programming in C.

The course covers topics such as programming with dynamic memory, working with files and directories, using the Standard C Library, and more. In addition, the course uses several Linux-specific tools and libraries such as GCC, make, Valgrind, and gdb.

By the end of this course, you will be able to confidently write C programs that make use of these powerful tools and be able to confidently apply to certificate programs as well.

4. C Programming with Linux

The Linux Foundation’s “C Programming with Linux” course is designed for students who want to learn how to program in C while also taking advantage of the many features that Linux has to offer.

Topics covered in this course include an overview of the C programming language, working with pointers and arrays, using system calls and library functions, debugging programs with gdb, and more.

In addition to gaining skills in C programming, you will also learn how to effectively use a number of powerful tools that are specific to Linux and get professional certificates from accredited certificate programs.

5. Learn The Linux Command Line: Basic Commands

Linode’s “Learn The Linux Command Line: Basic Commands” course is a great way for individuals who are new to working with the command-line interface (CLI).

The course covers topics such as an overview of the CLI, working with files and directories, managing processes, using text editors, understanding different Linux distributions and more. In addition to learning about the various commands that are available, you will also gain an understanding of how the Linux file system works.

By the end of this course, you will be able to confidently use the CLI to perform common tasks on a Linux system with good Linux skills.

  • Course Link: command-line
  • Expected Course Duration: 40 minutes

6. Linux Essentials

Linux Professional Institute or LPI’s “Linux Essentials” course is designed for individuals who want to learn the basics of working with Linux. Topics covered in this course include an overview of Linux history and development, working with files and directories, using text editors, administering users and groups, and more.

In addition, the course covers some important aspects of security such as file permissions and sudo. By the end of this course, you will have a good understanding of how to work with Linux on a daily basis.

7. Introduction to DevOps

IBM’s “Introduction to DevOps” course is designed for individuals who want to learn about DevOps practices and how they can be used to improve software development.

Topics covered in this course include an overview of DevOps principles, continuous integration and continuous delivery, managing web servers, using containers for software development and cloud computing, and more. In addition, the course makes use of a number of IBM-specific tools such as IBM Cloud DevOps Insights and IBM Bluemix.

By the end of this course, you will have a good understanding of how DevOps practices can be used to improve your software development workflow.

8. Introduction to Linux System Administration with IBM Power Systems

Linux System Administration with IBM Power Systems” course is designed for individuals who want to learn about administering IBM Power Systems.

Topics covered in this course include an overview of Power Systems hardware and software, working with the command-line interface, managing users and groups, installing and configuring software packages, and more.

In addition, the course makes use of a number of IBM-specific tools such as the Electronic Service Agent (ESA) and the Hardware Management Console (HMC). By the end of this course, you will have a good understanding of how to administer an IBM Power System.

9. Linux and Bash for Data Engineering

“Linux and Bash for Data Engineering” course is designed for a Linux engineer who wants to learn about working with data on a Linux system. Topics covered in this course include an overview of Bash scripting, working with files and directories, using text editors, big data and more.

In addition, the course makes use of a number of Google Cloud Platform-specific tools such as BigQuery and Dataproc. By the end of this course, you will have a good understanding of how to work with big data on a Linux system.

10. Learning Linux for LFCA Certification

The “Learning Linux for LFCA Certification” course is designed for individuals who want to earn the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCA) certification.

The course covers topics such as an overview of the LFCA exam objectives, installing and configuring Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), managing users and groups, administering software packages, and more.

In addition, the course makes use of a number of LFCS-specific tools such as Kickstart and Cobbler. By the end of this course, you will have everything you need to know in order to pass the LFCA exam and earn your certification.

11. Linux System Programming and Introduction to Buildroot

The Linux Foundation’s “Linux System Programming and Introduction to Buildroot” course is designed for individuals who want to learn about programming for the Linux kernel and how to install and use Buildroot.

Topics covered in this course include an overview of the C programming language, working with pointers and arrays, using system calls and library functions, debugging programs with gdb, and more. In addition, the course uses several Linux-specific tools such as GCC, make, Valgrind, and strace.

By the end of this course, you will have a good understanding of how to program for the Linux kernel and use Buildroot to build embedded Linux systems.

12. Open Source Software Development, Linux and Git

The University of Manchester’s “Open Source Software Development, Linux and Git” course is designed for individuals who want to learn about working in an open-source development environment.

Topics covered in this course include an introduction to open source software development, working with distributed version control systems (DVCS) such as Git, using the command-line interface (CLI), and more. In addition, the course makes use of a number of open-source tools and services such as GitHub and Jenkins.

By the end of this course, you will have a good understanding of how to work in an open-source development environment.

13. Hands-on introduction to Linux Commands and Shell Scripting

The Linux Foundation’s “Hands-on introduction to Linux Commands and Shell Scripting” course is designed for individuals who want to learn about working with the command-line interface (CLI) and writing shell scripts.

Topics covered in this course include an overview of the CLI, working with files and directories, using text editors, executing commands, and more. In addition, the course makes use of a number of Bash-specific features such as variables, functions, and looping constructs.

By the end of this course, you will be able to confidently use the CLI and write shell scripts to automate common tasks on a Linux system.

14. Linux Server Management and Security

The Linux Foundation’s “Linux Server Management and Security” course is designed for individuals who want to learn about administering a Linux server.

Topics covered in this course include an overview of server administration, managing users and groups, configuring network services, securing a Linux server, and more. In addition, the course makes use of a number of popular open-source tools such as Apache HTTP Server, OpenSSH, and tables.

By the end of this course, you will have a good understanding of how to administer a Linux server.

FAQ’s


What is Linux, and why is it important to learn?

Linux is a UNIX-like operating system that was originally created by Linus Torvalds with the help of developers around the world. Linux is typically packaged in a Linux distribution.

A typical Linux distribution includes a Linux kernel, GNU utilities and libraries, additional software, documentation, a window system (usually X11 or Wayland), a desktop environment, and a set of preferred applications. Debian, Slackware, and Fedora are some examples of popular Linux distributions.

Linux is important to learn because it’s used everywhere. It runs on servers, mainframes, embedded devices, mobile phones, and more. In addition to being free and open-source software, its robustness and security features make it ideal for powering mission-critical systems.

Many of the world’s largest organizations use Linux in one way or another including Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Microsoft.

What jobs can you get in Linux?

There are many different types of jobs that use Linux in some way including system administrator, DevOps engineer, software developer, site reliability engineer, and network engineer.

Depending on your skill set and experience, you may be able to find a job that solely uses Linux or one where it is just a part of the tech stack.

How can online courses help you learn Linux?

Online courses are a great way to learn Linux because they provide structure and guidance as you work through the material. They also usually come with resources such as cheat sheets, exercises, and projects to help you practice what you’ve learned.

In addition, most courses include some form of support whether it be in the form of a community or direct access to the instructors which can be very helpful when starting out. 

What skills or experience do I need to already have, before starting to learn Linux?

If you’re new to coding or servers then learning Linux can be a bit daunting. However, if you’re willing to put in the hard work then there are plenty of resources available to help you get started including tutorials, books, and online courses.

It’s important to have some basic understanding of computers and how they work before starting to learn Linux. In addition, having some experience with the command line will be helpful but is not required.

What kind of people are best suited for roles in Linux?

In general, people who are best suited for roles in Linux are those who are willing to learn new things and aren’t afraid of a challenge. If you’re interested in working with Linux then it’s important to be curious and have problem-solving skills.

Additionally, most jobs that use Linux require some form of coding so being able to write code is also a valuable skill.

How do I know if learning Linux is right for me?

If you’re interested in working with computers or servers then learning Linux is a good idea. It’s also beneficial to learn if you want to work with open-source software or join a company like Google, Facebook, or Amazon where Linux is used extensively.

However, if you’re not interested in these things then learning Linux may not be for you.

Where can I learn Linux for free?

There are many ways to learn Linux online for free including websites, YouTube channels, books, and free courses we have mentioned above.

Are there any free Linux certifications?

Yes, there are several organizations that offer free certification programs for individuals who want to demonstrate their skills in Linux. The two most popular options are the Linux Foundation and the Free Software Foundation.

Can I teach myself Linux?

Yes, it is possible to teach yourself Linux although it may be difficult depending on your prior experience and understanding of computers. There are many resources available online including tutorials, books, and courses that can help you learn Linux.

Additionally, there are several free certification programs that you can take to demonstrate your skills.

How much time it will take to learn Linux?

The amount of time it takes to learn Linux depends on your prior experience, level of commitment, and how you’re learning. If you’re starting from scratch then it could take anywhere from a few weeks to a few months to get comfortable with the basics.

However, if you already have some experience with computers or coding then it may only take a few days or weeks.

Is the LFCS Certification Worth It? Benefits, Cost, Comparison

Getting your Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) certification can be a great way to show employers that you have the skills they are looking for. But is it worth the cost? And what are the benefits? In this blog post, we’ll take a look at the LFCS certification and compare it to other options.

What is LFCS Certification?


The Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) certification is a credential that demonstrates an individual’s ability to perform common system administration tasks.

The exam covers topics such as installation and configuration, networking, security, and troubleshooting. To earn the LFCS certification, candidates must pass two exams: one written and one practical.

Is the LFCS Certification Worth It?


There is no doubt that the LFCS certification can be beneficial for those seeking a career in system administration.

The credential demonstrates an individual’s ability to perform common system administration tasks, which can be helpful in landing a job or getting a promotion. Furthermore, the LFCS certification is widely recognized and respected by employers.

However, the cost of the certification may be a deterrent for some individuals. The written exam costs $300, and the practical exam costs $600. In addition, there are membership fees associated with the Linux Foundation.

For these reasons, it is important to consider whether the LFCS certification is right for you before making the decision to pursue it.

LFCS Certification Exam Details


What format is the LFCS exam?

The LFCS exam is a written exam that consists of 60 multiple-choice questions. The questions cover a wide range of topics, including Linux administration, security, networking, and troubleshooting.

How many questions are on the LFCS exam?

The LFCS exam consists of 60 multiple-choice questions. The questions cover a wide range of topics, including Linux administration, security, networking, and troubleshooting. The exam is administered by Pearson VUE.

What is the passing score for the LFCS exam?

For the LFCS Exam, the passing score for the LFCS exam is 66% or above while For the LFCE Exam, a score of 57% or above is required to pass.

This means that you must answer at least 40 out of 60 questions correctly in order to pass the exam. The questions on the exam are weighted equally, so there is no specific number of correct answers required in each section.

For more details visit docs.linuxfoundation.org

How much does the LFCS exam cost?

The LFCS exam costs $375 USD. You can register for the exam through Pearson VUE.

How long is the LFCS exam?

The LFCS exam is two hours long. You will have one hour to complete the multiple-choice section of the exam, and one hour to complete the essay portion of the exam.

How long is the LFCS certification good for?


The LFCS certification is valid for three years. After that, you will need to retake the exam to maintain your certification.

However, if you take and pass an intermediate or advanced level Linux Foundation course during your three-year period, your LFCS certification will be automatically renewed for another three years.

So there is no need to worry about your certification expiring as long as you keep up with your learning!

Who should consider the LFCS certification?


LFCS is a Linux Foundation Certified SysAdmin. It is designed for system administrators who work with Linux systems, and who want to validate their skills and knowledge.

Any system administrator who works with Linux systems should consider becoming certified. Certification can help you validate your skills and knowledge, and it can also help you stand out from the competition when applying for jobs.

What are the Benefits of LFCS Certification?


Some of the benefits of LFCS certification include:

  • The credential is widely recognized and respected by employers.
  • The certification demonstrates an individual’s ability to perform common system administration tasks.
  • The credential can help in landing a job or getting a promotion.
  • The certification can be helpful in building a career in system administration.
  • The certification can give individuals a competitive edge when applying for jobs.
  • The certification can lead to higher earnings potential.

What is the Cost of LFCS Certification?


The cost of the LFCS certification can be a deterrent for some individuals. The written exam costs $375. As per source, The exam Prices will be Increased from July 1

For these reasons, it is important to consider whether the LFCS certification is right for you before making the decision to pursue it.

Jobs that use LFCS certification


LFCS certified professionals are in high demand as they possess the skills and knowledge needed to manage Linux systems.

There are a variety of jobs that use LFCS certification, including system administrator, network administrator, and web developer.

System administrators are responsible for the day-to-day operations of a computer system, including installing and configuring software, troubleshooting hardware, and software issues, and maintaining system security.

Network administrators manage and maintain computer networks, ensuring that they are secure and running smoothly.

Web developers create and maintain websites, ensuring that they are accessible to users and meet their needs.

LFCS certification is recognized by many employers as a sign of competence in managing Linux systems. It can open doors to new career opportunities and help you advance in your current job. If you’re looking to start or further your career in the IT field, consider pursuing LFCS certification.

Comparison of LFCS Certification and Other Options


When considering the LFCS certification, it is also important to compare it to other options. Some of the other certifications that are available include:

  • RHCSA (Red Hat Certified System Administrator)
  • LPIC-1 (Linux Professional Institute Certification Level 1)
  • CompTIA Linux+

Each of these certifications has its own benefits and costs. It is important to compare and contrast the different options in order to decide which one is right for you.

LFCS vs LPIC certification


There is no doubt that the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) and the Linux Professional Institute Certification (LPIC) are two of the most popular certifications for those who want to work with Linux.

But which one should you get?

The LFCS is a newer certification, having only been released in 2013. It is designed specifically for system administrators who want to use Linux in their job. The LPIC, on the other hand, has been around since 1999 and covers a broader range of topics related to Linux.

So, which one is right for you? If you’re sure that you want to be a Linux system administrator, then the LFCS is probably the better choice.

If you’re interested in a more general Linux certification, or if you’re not sure which direction you want your career to go in, then the LPIC might be a better option.

There is one other factor to consider: cost. The LFCS costs $300, while the LPIC costs $600. So, if you’re on a budget, the LFCS is probably the better choice.

At the end of the day, though, the best way to decide which certification is right for you is to look at the job descriptions for positions you’re interested in and see which certification is required or preferred. Whichever certification will help you get the job you want is the one you should get.

Conclusion


The LFCS certification can be a great way to show employers that you have the skills they are looking for. But is it worth the cost? And what are the benefits? In this blog post, we’ve taken a look at the LFCS certification and compared it to other options.

Is the LPIC-1 certification Worth It? Benefits, Cost, Comparison?

The LPIC-1 certification is an internationally recognized standard for Linux system administration. It is administered by the Linux Professional Institute (LPI), and is one of the most popular Linux certifications.

The LPIC-1 certification is generally considered to be a valuable credential for IT professionals who want to show their expertise in Linux systems administration. The benefits of the certification include increased job opportunities, higher salaries, and improved career prospects.

What is the LPIC-1 certification?


The LPIC-1 certification is the entry-level Linux Professional Institute Certification. It is designed to validate your skills and knowledge of Linux system administration.

The LPIC-1 certification examinations are divided into two parts, each of which must be passed in order to earn the credential. To earn your LPIC-1, you must pass two exams: 101 and 102.

LPIC-1 certification Exam Details


LPIC-1 exam 101 topics cover topics such as System Architecture, Linux Installation, and Package Management, GNU and Unix Commands, Devices, Linux Filesystems, and Filesystem Hierarchy Standard.

LPIC-1 exam 102 topics build on these foundation topics with more advanced content, covering areas such as Shells and Shell Scripting, Interfaces and Desktops, Administrative Tasks, Essential System Services, Networking Fundamentals, and Security.

You can take the exam online via OnVUE in various languages such as English, Japanese, Portuguese (Brazilian), and Spanish.

You can also give the exam by going physically to VUE test centers in various leagues such as English, German, Japanese, Portuguese (Brazilian), Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), and Spanish (Modern).

How much does LPIC-1 certification exam cost?

The cost of LPIC-1 certification varies depending on the country you are living in. Like in the USA, LPIC-1 Exam 101 Voucher and Exam 102 Voucher will cost you $200 each while in India, it will cost you $90 each.

What is the passing score for LPIC-1 exam?

There are 2 exams, each with a total score of 800. You need a passing score of 500 to get the certification.

How hard is the LPIC-1 exam?


The LPIC-1 exam is not an easy exam. It requires a lot of knowledge and understanding of Linux systems. If you are not familiar with Linux, then you will likely find the exam to be very difficult.

There are many resources available to help you prepare for the LPIC-1 exam, but it is still recommended that you have some experience with Linux before taking the exam.

What is covered in the LPIC-1 exam?

The LPIC-1 exam covers topics such as system architecture, installations and configurations, networking, security, and more. Candidates who pass the LPIC-1 exam will earn the Linux Professional Institute Certification Level 1 (LPIC-1).

The LPIC-1 is the first certification in the Linux Professional Institute’s three-level certification program. It is designed to validate a candidate’s ability to perform essential system administration tasks.

Topics covered on the LPIC-1 exam include:

  • System Architecture: Understand system components and boot sequence.
  • Installations and Configurations: Install a clean Linux system and configure it for specific purposes.
  • Networking Fundamentals: Configure basic networking services such as DNS and DHCP.
  • Security: Implement security measures to secure a Linux system

Who should consider the LPIC-1 certification?


The LPIC-1 certification is designed for entry-level Linux professionals. This certification is a great way to get started in a career in Linux, and it can also help you advance your career if you are already working in the field.

The LPIC-1 certification covers topics such as installation and configuration, networking, security, and more. If you want to be a certified Linux professional, the LPIC-1 is a great place to start.

How long does IT take to get LPIC-1?


The LPIC-1 certification is an entry-level Linux certification, so it does not require a lot of experience to get started. You can expect to spend about 20 hours studying for the exam, and the entire process (including taking the exam) should take about two months.

Does LPIC-1 certification expire?


Yes, the validity of LPIC-1 certification is 5 years unless retaken or a higher level is achieved.

How many LPI certifications are there?


There are three LPI certifications: LPIC-1, LPIC-2, and LPIC-3. Each certification has its own exam, and each level is progressively more difficult.

  • The LPIC-1 is the entry-level certification and is designed to give you a basic understanding of Linux systems.
  • The LPIC-2 is an intermediate-level certification and covers more advanced topics such as networking and security.
  • The LPIC-3 is the highest level certification and covers everything from system administration to programming. To become certified at all three levels, you must pass all three exams.

LPIC-1 vs. Linux+: Which is Better?


There is no clear winner when it comes to LPIC-1 vs CompTIA Linux+. Both exams are tough, and both will require a lot of preparation. However, there are some key differences between the two that may make one more suitable for you than the other.

CompTIA Linux+ is geared more towards beginners. It covers basic topics such as installation, configuration, and networking. LPIC-1, on the other hand, is geared towards those with more experience. It covers topics such as system administration, security, and troubleshooting.

If you’re just starting out, CompTIA Linux+ may be the better choice for you. However, if you have some experience under your belt, LPIC-1 may be a better fit. Whichever exam you choose, make sure you’re prepared before taking it. Good luck!

You can also check this video about the comparison between LPIC-1 and Linux on YouTube.

LPIC-1 certification Alternatives


LPIC-1 is the entry-level certification for Linux Professionals. LPIC-1 certified individuals have demonstrated the ability to perform maintenance tasks on both the command line and GUI, as well as configure local user accounts, network settings, and security.

If you’re interested in pursuing a career in Linux administration, or if you’re already working in the field and want to validate your skills, LPIC-1 is a great place to start. But what if you’re not sure you’re ready for LPIC-1? Or maybe you’re looking for an alternative certification that will better suit your needs.

Here are four alternatives to LPIC-1 that can help you get started in your Linux career:


1. Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS)

The Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) is a great option for those who want to start their career in Linux administration or move up from an entry-level position.

The LFCS certification covers topics such as installation and configuration, networking, security, and troubleshooting. To earn your LFCS, you’ll need to pass two exams: one written exam and one practical exam.

2. Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA)

Red Hat is one of the most popular distributions of Linux, so it’s no surprise that their certification program is also highly respected. The RHCSA certification covers many of the same topics as the LFCS, including installation, configuration, networking, and security.

However, the RHCSA also covers Red Hat-specific tools and technologies. To earn your RHCSA, you’ll need to pass one written exam and one practical exam.

Also read: Is the Red Hat Linux certification Worth It?

3. SUSE Certified Linux Administrator (CLA)

SUSE is another popular Linux distribution, and their CLA certification is a great option for those interested in becoming a Linux administrator. The CLA covers topics such as installation and configuration, networking, security, and troubleshooting.

To earn your CLA, you’ll need to pass two exams: one written exam and one practical exam.

Also read: What is SUSE Linux Certification? Its cost, comparison and use.

4. Ubuntu Certified Professional (UCP)

Ubuntu is a Debian-based distribution of Linux that is becoming increasingly popular. The UCP certification covers topics such as installation and configuration, networking, security, and troubleshooting. To earn your UCP, you’ll need to pass one written exam and one practical exam.

These are just four of the many options available to those interested in pursuing a career in Linux administration. Each certification has its own strengths and weaknesses, so be sure to do your research before deciding which one is right for you.

What is SUSE Linux Certification? Its cost, comparison and use.

SUSE certification is a professional certification program that recognizes IT professionals who have demonstrated expertise in SUSE Linux Enterprise Server.

Certification provides validation of an individual’s technical skills and knowledge and can lead to increased opportunities for career advancement.

The program offers three levels of certification: Certified Administrator, Certified Engineer, and Certified Specialist. Each level has its own set of exams that must be successfully completed in order to earn the certification.

To maintain certification, individuals must complete continuing education requirements every three years.

The SUSE Certified Administrator (SCA) credential is designed for individuals who want to demonstrate their skills in administering SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. The SCA exam covers topics such as installation, configuration, networking, security, and troubleshooting.

Is SUSE Linux Certification Traning Free?


Yes, SUSE Linux Certification Training is free. They have Announced Free Access To Online Training. From April 2020, SUSE has made available course content from select, existing training videos free on the SUSE Technical Training YouTube channel.

SUSE Certification Exams 


Once you have learned the skills using training, it’s time to validate your skills with SUSE Certification. You have to choose between three levels: SUSE Certified Administrators, SUSE Certified Engineers, or SUSE Certified Specialists.

To get SUSE Linux Certification, you have to follow three steps:

1. Choose Your Exam

You have to choose the type of exam you want to give be it for Administrators, Engineers, or specialists. You can filter by the product and your skill level on this page.

2. Register and Take Your Exam

Once you have selected your exam, register it by paying the fee and filling up your required details. You can log in to your SUSE account to view instructions on how to purchase and schedule your exam.

3. Validate Your Certification

Once you have given the exam, you can find the result by logging into your SUSE account and download your certificate.

Here are more details with exam cost, time, and type:

SUSE Certified Administrators Exams:

SCA in SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15

  • Cost: $149
  • Exam Type: Question based; 70 questions
  • Code: sca_sles15 (previously 050-754)

SCA in SUSE Rancher 2.6

  • Cost: $149
  • Exam Type: Question based; 70 questions
  • Code: sca_ran2_6

SCA in SUSE Manager 4

  • Cost: $149
  • Exam Type: Question based; 70 questions
  • Code: sca_suma4

SUSE Certified Engineers Exams:

SCE in SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15:

  • Cost: $195
  • Exam Type: Question based; 80 questions
  • Code: sce_sles_15 (previously 050-755)

SUSE Certified Specialists Exams:

SCA+ in SLES for SAP Applications 12

  • Cost: $149
  • Exam Type: Question based; 70 questions
  • Code: scap_sap (previously 050-762)

SCA+ in SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability:

  • Cost: $149
  • Exam Type: Question based; 70 questions
  • Code: scap_ha (previously 050-757)

SCDS in SUSE Rancher and Kubernetes Distributions:

  • Cost: $149
  • Exam Type: Question based; 70 questions
  • Code: scds_ran_k8s

SCDS in SUSE Manager 4:

  • Cost: $149
  • Exam Type: Question based; 70 questions
  • Code: scds_suma_4

Common Details:

  • Scoring: The passing score is 70% for every exam.
  • Exam Length is same or all exams: 90 minutes
  • Retake Policy: Every Exam has a retake policy to wait for 72 hours before you can retake the exam, if you do not pass it.

Is SLES and SUSE the same?


SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) is a commercial distribution of the Linux operating system that is developed and supported by SUSE. SLES is designed for enterprise users and is available in both physical and virtual formats.

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) is based on the community-developed open source operating system, openSUSE. The two distributions share a common codebase, but SLES includes additional enterprise-grade features and support that are not found in the open source version.

So while SLES and SUSE are closely related, they are not the same thing. SLES is a commercial product created by SUSE, while SUSE is the company behind both SLES and openSUSE.

Does Microsoft own Suse Linux?


No, Microsoft does not own SUSE Linux. SUSE is a German-based company that develops and supports the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) distribution of the Linux operating system.

SLES is available in both physical and virtual formats and is designed for enterprise users. Microsoft has partnered with SUSE in the past, but the two companies are not currently affiliated.

What is the difference between Suse Linux and RedHat Linux?


There are a few key differences between SUSE Linux and Red Hat Linux.

First, SUSE Linux is a commercial distribution while Red Hat Linux is available under either a commercial or open source license.

Second, SUSE Linux is developed and supported by the German company SUSE while Red Hat Linux is developed and supported by the US-based company Red Hat.

Finally, SUSE Linux offers a few features that are not found in Red Hat Linux, such as live patching and transactional server updates. Overall, both distributions are very similar but there are slight differences that may make one more appealing to certain users than the other.

Also Read: Is the Red Hat Linux certification Worth It?

What companies use SUSE?


SUSE Linux is used by a number of large companies, including Amazon, BMW, Dell, and Hewlett Packard. SUSE Linux is also the basis for a number of other commercial distributions, such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and Oracle Linux.

While SUSE Linux is not as widely used as some other distributions, it is favored by many enterprise users due to its stability and features.

How Long Does It Take to Learn SUSE Linux?


The amount of time it takes to learn SUSE Linux will vary depending on your previous experience with Linux and other operating systems. If you are already familiar with Linux, it should not take long to learn the basics of SUSE Linux.

However, if you are new to Linux, it may take some time to get up to speed. In general, it is recommended that you allow at least a few weeks to learn the basics of SUSE Linux before attempting to use it for real-world tasks.

How Much Does SUSE Linux Cost?


SUSE Linux is available in both physical and virtual formats. The cost of SUSE Linux will vary depending on the version you choose and whether you purchase a support subscription.

In general, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) starts at $799 for a standard plan with one-year maintenance and support, patches, and updates. For a priority plan, the cost starts at $1499 per year.

There are also discounts available for a three or five years plans. Check here for more details.

Conclusion


Overall, SUSE Linux is a stable and feature-rich distribution that is favored by many enterprise users. The cost of SUSE Linux will vary depending on the version you choose and whether you purchase a support subscription.

However, overall, SUSE Linux is an affordable option for businesses looking to deploy a Linux server.

What is the Linux Certified Professional Salary?

A Linux Certified Professional (LCP) is someone who has obtained certification in Linux administration. The LCP certification demonstrates that the certified professional has the skills and knowledge necessary to manage a Linux system.

As technology advances, so does the demand for qualified professionals to manage it. Linux Certified Professionals are in high demand and can command a respectable salary.

Certification can be obtained from various organizations, such as the Linux Foundation or Red Hat. The salary of a Linux Certified Professional can vary depending on their level of experience and the organization that issued the certification. Generally, professionals with more experience and certifications will earn a higher salary.

So, what is the average salary for an LCP? And what kind of job opportunities are available for certified professionals? Read on to find out!

What Is Red Hat Certified System Administrator (Rhcsa) Salary


Red Hat Certified System Administrator (Rhcsa) is a certification offered by Red Hat, Inc. to system administrators who have passed a qualification exam. The average salary for a Red Hat Certified System Administrator (Rhcsa) is $114,700.

What Is Red Hat Certified Engineer Salary


As per payscale.com, the average salary for a Red Hat Certified Engineer is from $86,789 to $108,040  based on job title, and skills,

CompTIA Linux plus Certification Salary


According to Indeed.com, the average salary for someone with a CompTIA Linux plus Certification is $77,360 per year.

Entry Level Linux Jobs Salary


The average salary for an entry-level Linux administrator is $60000 per year. However, with the right skills and experience, you could earn as much as $80000 per year.

Entry Level Linux System Administrator Salary


According to Indeed, the average salary for an entry-level Linux system administrator is $76,567. However, this number can vary greatly depending on your experience and skill level.

Linux System Administrator Salary Nyc


The average salary for a Linux system administrator in New York City is $118,437 but ranges from $94,305 and $133,572.

Linux Certification Salary in India


Linux Certification Salary in India is quite good. According to Salary.com, the average salary for a Linux system administrator in India is ₹835,711 per year.

Jobs That Require Linux Certification


There are many jobs that require Linux certification. Some of these jobs include system administrator, network administrator, and information technology (IT) manager. Obtaining a Linux certification can help you qualify for one of these jobs or even help you move up in your current position.

System administrator: A system administrator is responsible for the upkeep, configuration, and reliable operation of computer systems. They often work in an organization’s IT department and are responsible for ensuring that all the systems within the organization are up and running smoothly. In order to qualify for this job, you will need to have a Linux certification.

Network administrator: A network administrator is responsible for the design, implementation, and maintenance of an organization’s network infrastructure. They ensure that all devices on the network are able to communicate with each other and that the network runs smoothly. To qualify for this job, you will need to have a Linux certification.

Information technology (IT) manager: An IT manager is responsible for the overall planning, coordination, and execution of all the IT-related activities within an organization. They develop and implement IT policies and procedures and ensure that all the systems within the organization are functioning properly. In order to qualify for this job, you will need to have a Linux certification.

Linux certification can help you qualify for many different types of jobs. If you are interested in working in the IT field, obtaining a Linux certification is a great way to get started.

Is Oracle Linux Certification Worth It?

Are you thinking of getting an Oracle Linux certification? You’re not alone. Many people are interested in this certification. But is it worth the investment? In this blog post, we’ll take a look at Is Oracle Linux certification worth it and what you can expect to gain from it.

We’ll also compare it to other popular Linux certifications to help you decide if it’s the right choice for you.

Oracle Linux certification is a valuable credential, but it’s not for everyone. If you’re looking to break into the IT field or are already working in the industry, Oracle Linux certification can help you progress your career.

But if you’re just starting out, there are other certifications that may be a better investment of your time and money. So, is Oracle Linux certification worth it? The answer depends on your goals and experience.

Oracle Linux Certification Overview


Oracle Linux is a Unix-like computer operating system assembled under the direction of Oracle Corporation and built from freely available software components.

Oracle Linux certification is an industry-recognized credential that demonstrates expertise in deploying and managing Oracle Linux systems. Candidates who earn the Oracle Linux certification can use it to show employers that they have the skills and knowledge necessary to perform effectively in roles such as system administrator, database administrator, or cloud administrator.

To earn the Oracle Linux certification, candidates must pass one or more exams. Exam topics include installation and configuration, update management, security, networking, and storage.

The Oracle Linux certification is just one of many Oracle certifications available. Others include the Oracle Database Administrator Certified Professional (OCP) and the Oracle Certified Cloud Administrator (OCCA).

How much does Oracle Linux certification cost?


Oracle certification is not free. Certification exams cost $245 each.

Oracle Linux 8 Advanced System Administration Exam Details


  • Format: Multiple Choice
  • Duration: 90 Minutes
  • Exam Price: $245
  • Number of Questions: 60
  • Passing Score: 60%
  • Validation: This exam has been validated against Version 8

Who should consider the Oracle Linux certification


Oracle Linux certifications are most beneficial for system administrators and engineers who manage Oracle Linux systems in a production environment. Additionally, Oracle Linux certifications are beneficial for:

  • System administrators who want to demonstrate their expertise in deploying and managing Oracle Linux systems
  • System engineers who want to demonstrate their expertise in architecture, design, and deployment of Oracle Linux systems
  • Support personnel who want to demonstrate their expertise in supporting Oracle Linux systems
  • Consultants who want to demonstrate their expertise in deploying and configuring Oracle Linux systems for their clients
  • IT professionals who want to add an Oracle Linux certification to their existing credentials

Individuals who are already certified on another UNIX or Linux platform may also find value in becoming Oracle Linux certified as it will broaden their skillset and make them more marketable.

How long is the Oracle Linux certification good for?


Oracle Linux certifications are valid for 5 years. To maintain active certification, candidates must either retake the exam or complete a training course within that timeframe.

Oracle Linux certification salary


Oracle Linux certification can give you a salary from $62,520 – $121,550 per year. The average salary for an Oracle Linux Systems Administrator is $83,961 per year.

Is the Oracle Linux certification Exam Hard?


The Oracle Linux certification exam is not hard, but it is comprehensive. It covers a wide range of topics, so you need to be well-prepared before taking the exam.

Is Oracle Linux the same as Red Hat?


No, Oracle Linux is not the same as Red Hat. Oracle Linux is based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), but it is a separate distribution. Oracle offers support for Oracle Linux, whereas Red Hat does not.

Also read: Is the Red Hat Linux certification Worth It

Conclusion – Is Oracle Linux certification Worth It?


Oracle Linux certification is worth it if you want to become a certified Oracle Linux administrator. The exam is comprehensive, but it’s not hard if you’re well-prepared. Oracle offers support for its own distribution of Linux, whereas Red Hat does not. So, if you’re looking for job security and want to be an expert in Oracle Linux, getting certified is definitely the way to go.

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